IOS 11 Will Stop App Developers Abusing Location Permissions

Posted June 15, 2017

Custom, in-app prompts used by developers require the user to move over to the App Store to leave a review, a solution that may yield feedback but also pulls the user out of the app itself in order to do so. It was available from a seller named on the site as "Ngan Vo Thi Thuy" and despite the outrageous price, the app has managed to make it onto the app store's top earners list for the past two months. Because every app in the App Store has to be approved by Apple, curious consumers can download and try out any number of apps without having to worry about malware, adware, or any other type of issue that Apple likes to claim plagues the Google Play Store.

Apple will impose limits on how many times apps may present a pop-up to ask you to review them on the App Store, 9to5Mac reported.

The latest design offers separate tabs for games and apps. According to marketing data firm Sensor Tower, the bogus app delivers more or less US$80,000 each month in revenue. To earn that amount the app would only need around 200 subscribers.

Turns out, scammers are abusing Apple's relatively new and immature App Store Search Ads product.

The tipping option is not the only changes in the new App Store policies.

For Apple, the tipping is not encouragement for content creators, rather the same as the purchase of game, music and video, which should be classified as in-app purchase, and Apple can take 30 percent as commission. As Gruber notes, app's appearance on the App Store was offensive to legitimate developers who've been struggling with Apple's review process.

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The first of those surprises, the "Super-Duper Graphics Pack", will be downloadable "this fall" as a free upgrade for the game . Saved data, purchased content, and world progress will transfer over from the older versions of the game to the new one.

"Given the bad title of this app", Lin writes, "I was sure this was a bug in the rankings algorithm".

"Your app contains images and references of Pepe the Frog, which are considered objectionable content", an Apple App Review Board employee wrote in a rejection notice to Spirit Realm, Vice's Motherboard confirmed.

"They're taking advantage of the fact that there's no filtering or approval process for ads, and that ads look nearly indistinguishable from real results, and some ads take up the entire search result's first page", wrote Lin.

The app exposes several problems with the App Store now.

Gruber argued that Apple needs to reassess "the effects of allowing developers to buy their way to the top spot in search results".

We've reached out to Apple for comment on this practice.